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Josh Andrews

Paraplanner

Strengths:

  • FuturisticPeople especially talented in the Futuristic theme are inspired by the future and what could be. They inspire others with their visions of the future.
  • BeliefPeople especially talented in the Belief theme have certain core values that are unchanging. Out of these values emerges a defined purpose for their life.
  • StrategicPeople especially talented in the Strategic theme create alternative ways to proceed. Faced with any given scenario, they can quickly spot the relevant patterns and issues.
  • ConnectednessPeople especially talented in the Connectedness theme have faith in the links between all things. They believe there are few coincidences and that almost every event has a reason.
  • MaximizerPeople especially talented in the Maximizer theme focus on strengths as a way to stimulate personal and group excellence. They seek to transform something strong into something superb.

Professional Experience

Josh joined Resource Consulting Group in November 2017 as a paraplanner. He supports advisors in the firm by gathering data, preparing documents required for financial planning meetings, and maintaining relationships with clients.

Josh graduated from Florida State University in August 2014 with a Bachelor of Science in Economics. He then moved to Birmingham, AL to pursue his MBA at Samford University. While in Samford’s evening program, he worked for Sterne, Agee & Leach as a margin analyst and then for a small financial planning firm as an associate. After moving back home to Orlando, Josh worked for CNL Securities where he supported several teams of wholesalers.

In his free time, Josh enjoys playing basketball, watching sports, and spending time with his wife, Haley. They are avid supporters of FSU sports and Young Life.

Personal Thoughts

I lived in Birmingham, AL from August 2014 to July 2016. I was working full time, going to school at night, and barely getting by on my own income. Like many college students, I was burdened by an unreliable car. My grandfather (nicknamed “Pappaw”) has owned his own auto shop in Kissimmee, FL for more than 30 years. There is no one I trust more when it comes to cars than him. In my first month in Birmingham, my car broke down and I called Pappaw immediately. He recommended a shop with similar credentials to his own. Upon arrival, I jokingly told my new mechanic, “If you do a good job, I promise that I’ll be back once a month.”

After numerous breakdowns, tows, and repairs, I finally upgraded my car. Just when I thought I had seen the last of my car problems, a light on my dashboard told me that my tire pressure was low—and dropping. I knew that I had to get it fixed before the end of the day. On my lunch break, I drove to a tire store to see what the issue was. They told me that I had a nail stuck in my tire and my only solution was to have it replaced for upwards of $200. I decided to call my local mechanic for a second opinion. He told me to come by the shop after work and that he’d stay late to inspect my tire. He plugged the hole in my tire and had me back on the road for less than $10. I was so relieved and very, very grateful.

As someone who doesn’t know much about cars, I am very thankful for the mechanics in my life. Driving home from my mechanic that day, I thought about how I’d never go back to that tire store. While their recommendation was off-putting, I realized that they were in the business of selling tires, not servicing them. To them, my tire represented a transaction. To my mechanic, my tire represented an ongoing relationship and continuous service to a valued customer. My car experiences have taught me that expert advice is invaluable, relationships matter, and that I should call my Pappaw more often.